Is anyone watching The Chosen?

Is anyone watching The Chosen? I came to it after the first series and really enjoying it. If you haven’t found it yet it’s free on the Chosen app. It was also on YouTube but not sure if it still is.

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Hello, I’ve watched it, really enjoyed it!*** Know it’s not 100% biblical, but it made me realize that the disciples were just humans!*** Looking forward to season 3 :grin:

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Me too.:wink: We can compare notes.

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Sounds awesome :ok_hand: :blush: who is your favorite character out if the disciples?***

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That’s not easy but Matthew is interesting. I love the humanity of it all.

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Lol, he is my favorite :laughing:
Definitely, think that’s what keeps me interested. I’m seeing the Word in a new light now, in the sense that I can relate as being a saved sinner :blush:

@JFelts8031, I agree with you, very controversial opinions on the series, to my mind, better than Hollywood entertainment!*** And our Almighty Lord will use everything for His glory as you said - AMEN :pray:

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I watched the first season and waiting for the second one.

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The second season has been out for awhile.

Are you able to watch it?

We are waiting for the third season now. Maybe in a year.

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you can also watch all episodes @ Angel Studies.com

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Oh thank you, I am a little behind :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes: I enjoy this show so much and it gives me hope. It’s better then any other shows from before. Can’t wait to watch. God bless :pray::pray:

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The chosen is one of my favorite shows! Truly a blessing

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This is a really interesting take on The Chosen. Interested in others’ opinions. It’s a long article, so here is a multiple-paragraph excerpt:

For those who are still not seeing the problem with this, let’s consider a program that makes the highly publicized claim that it’s helping people get to know Jesus better and to recognize similarities with the “Jesus of different faiths.” What if the Jesus we are being introduced to is not the biblical Jesus, but rather a spirit that was produced in heaven? Suppose he was the spirit brother of Lucifer, and his earthly birth was not by a virgin but came about through sexual intercourse with Mary by his father god who resides on a planet near a star called Kolob? What if this “Jesus” worked toward becoming a god by taking Mary, her sister Martha, and Mary Magdalene as wives, and thereby producing children necessary for him to become a god? And the godhood that this Jesus achieved enabled him to become the god of this world, taking his place among the multitude of gods ruling over numerous other worlds?

Hopefully you’re thinking, “That’s not the Jesus I know from God’s Word!” However, it is the “Jesus” that the executive producer of The Chosen, Derral Eves, believes in, as do most of the other series’ producers such as Ricky Ray Butler and Jeffrey and Neil Harmon. Neil Harmon, as co-founder with his brother Jeffrey of VidAngel (now ironically titled Angel Studios—see Galatians 1:8), the Utah-based distributor of The Chosen, declared that he and his brother Jeffrey are “faithful members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. We love Jesus and we love our faith in Christ.”

If that were the Jesus that The Chosen series is introducing us to, would that be a concern? As some may have surmised, the Jesus described above is not the biblical Jesus but rather the Jesus of Mormonism, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the faith to which many of the series producers belong. But is that the Jesus of The Chosen? Thus far in the series the fundamental doctrines of Mormonism have not been plainly presented. Could they be? Yes — but perhaps not yet.

Yes, because The Chosen’s audience has been conditioned to accept whatever the screenwriter, director, and other creative personnel contribute, with no apparent concern for biblical accuracy. The program that launched the series, for example, was the background story of Mary Magdalene that included the death of her father when she was young, her being raped by a Roman soldier, and the failure of Nicodemus as he attempted to exorcise demons from her. Those details came not from Scripture but from the imagination of those who contributed to the script. Yet for the greater number of viewers, few of whom have read the Bible, the images they watched were received as though they are actually in the Bible.

I’ve been told biblical movies are great motivators for people to check the Bible out. Really? What happens when they can’t find the movie scenes such as the gritty backstory of Mary Magdalene? Furthermore, most people would rather watch a highly dramatized Bible story with little concern that it’s fiction than read the actual words of Scripture. “Based on a true story” is good enough, even though the “based” part is a movie fabrication.

I have interviewed numerous believers who viewed so-called biblical movies, and although most of these Christians knew the Bible pretty well, I was dismayed to find that they actually believed that many of the unbiblical scenes in those productions were found in the Bible! Difficulty in distinguishing between what one may have read in the Bible and what one saw on screen in an alleged biblical movie is one of the damaging effects of presenting biblical content visually. That notwithstanding, why would a believer in God’s Word fill his or her head with things that are made to appear biblical by a film company — but are not?

My “perhaps not yet” comment has to do with Mormonism’s continual attempt to promote itself as basically Christian in its theology. For years the organization has strived to be accepted as just another Christian denomination. The only way that can happen is if the LDS Church initially conceals its fundamental beliefs and packs its promotional productions with all sorts of unbiblical scenes and characters. The more that such corruptions are accepted, the wider the door opens for any-and-all beliefs to be introduced, including the bizarre doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It also helps to have a professing evangelical writer/director (Dallas Jenkins) working on The Chosen. His promotional interview with a Mormon apologist is a classic example of obfuscatory ecumenism, meaning he does his best to muddy the waters between foundational biblical Christianity (which he claims to believe) and the cultic teachings of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. His ecumenism is made clear in his own words: “I said that many LDS folks and I love the same Jesus. I still believe that. It’s gotten me in a lot of trouble but I still believe that.”

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Wow that was very informative. No wonder many people love and enjoy the series. I think this might be a good lesson to be a Berean and search the scriptures to see if the parts of the show are true.

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I have watched the first season only. I did not know a lot of the background of the producers ect… I thank you for the information, I have not watched the 2nd or 3rd season. GOD bless!!

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You are very welcome. I also watched, and purchased, the first season. The article gave me a lot to think about because I love bible movies - it made some good points concerning adding to what the Word says.

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I agree it’s never right to change his word. Thank you again for putting that out their. :pray::pray:

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I’d suggest watching the Berean Call on YouTube which just did a podcast about this program.
Not sure people know the writer is Mormon.

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