What Have You Planted

Whats the update of your garden?

Since i have poor soil, i decided to go into container and raised beds ( technically, could be one in the same).
Im growing Zucchini in tomato cages, keeping under leaves snipped and trying expose more air so that mold doesnt take over. So far, God willing and I do pray over the garden…the Zucchini is forming …finally!
Tomatoes are producing…new variety. Tried the Heirloom…they didnt do flip.
Pulled onions…wasnt worth my time.
Eggplant is producing.
Peppers have become nutrient hogs…got my fish emulsion and douse and they recover. Been getting Jalapeños…going to bake some today wrapped in bacon.
Bought a dehydrator and the rest of the peppers will undergo that treatment so that i can have my pepper flakes.
Watermelons and cantaloupe are producing fruit.
The sun has been brutal on some plants…so i move them out of direct sunlight ( seed package states plant in full sun…not in Texas).
Been raining nicely of late. …

Added note: im growing my cantaloupe on an " A" frame cattle panels. Ive got two cantaloupe hanging from the panels. I support them by placing the melons in a netted bag secured with zip ties or other (the nets are from my onions and fruit in that type of container. If it gets too heavy I’ll get boards to place through the openings of panels.

4 Likes

Zucchini is huge but the fruit is small and not taking off. I had a pest problem that was attacking one of the plants but i think i saved it.
Onions are being pulled. They’re ok but not very big this year. I have 1 yellow straight neck ready to pick.
Tomatoes are formed just still green. Bush beans are flowering. Okra growing. Cucumbers are bushy green but no fruit yet. Red potatoes are almost ready to harvest. Sweet potatoes are growing well.
Peppers have been anemic but hopefully will take off.
It’s cooler today. Going to go out and water soon.

2 Likes

Actually, I’m behind on pretty much everything. But most of it is planted so it will come when it comes. Life kinda got in the way of a schedule this spring and I just can’t go back to March and start over.

Most everything is growing, some stuff better than others. The cool weather stuff is suffering because the sun has just been brutal. Summer stuff is coming but not here yet. Onions are way behind but we’ll get what we get. Cukes & squash haven’t started yet. Corn is still only a foot high. The cherry tomatoes are about the size of my thumb but not ready yet. Peanuts are just coming up. Potatoes have nice tops on them but haven’t made much under the ground yet. Okra is less than a foot tall but growing. Have some carrots, turnips and beets that are about ready for a harvest. (The carrots are much sweeter if they’re grown over the winter but we’ll take these, too.) Just harvested a little mint for a batch of mint tea and tasted the first of that this morning. :slight_smile: Have been getting strawberries and asparagus, those were planted in earlier years so came when they were ready, not because of anything I had to do. Peas and beans of various kinds coming but not here yet…

Anyway, I’m sure I forgot some things…

3 Likes

Im trying to grow flowers between these plants to draw in the bees and such to pollinate.
The bloom rot was on a couple of Zucchini and thats from lack of pollinating…so it was told .
Even the flowers look weak…Zinnias, and Nasturtium or finally emerging. Zinnias were an easy flower to grow at one time ( i bought heirloom type) and paid over $4.00 a pkg. I expected more.
My basil and choclate mint are doing well. I really like the Cinnamon Basil. Its delicious in salads.

1 Like

Sure could use advice on growing carrots and beets. I have not had success here.

1 Like

I’ve had more success in grow pots for carrots, mainly because they don’t like hitting rocks and obstructions as they grow downward.

My biggest thing so far has been giving them enough room. I have terrible results when I try to put them too close together. For the carrots, I tried some pelleted seed, and that works well. I can’t say it’s any better than just using the loose seed IF I’ll actually thin them like I should. I’ve never had any luck trying to transplant tiny carrot seedlings though a few on YouTube have tried.

Beets, I have had the best luck transplanting. They’re a pain to do that way. But I’ve had a terrible time trying to get them to germinate and still have space to grow. I always have a hard time thinning them, too, though I’ve had more success with them growing out in the gardens.

Both of them would rather not be growing in the dead of summer and the carrots that grow over winter are so much sweeter (it’s because of the cold). But I’m still growing both now.

FWIW, beet greens are good to eat, not just the roots, as are turnip greens, and rutabaga greens. :slight_smile:

Anyway, hang in there. Keep trying. Learn if you can. Sometimes timing can be challenging.

1 Like

Maybe I am not planting at the right time of year.
North Texas. Plant in fall?

Yes. :slight_smile:

Probably late fall. The thought is that you want to plant them early enough that they can do most of their growing before winter sets in and they don’t really grow much at all. They won’t die over winter but they won’t grow much, either. (Still don’t know if it’s all about the light or whether it’s partly about the heat, too.)

Carrots have a survival mechanism of sorts such that when they get really cold, they make a sort of “carrot antifreeze” that helps them to survive. And that is what is soooooooo sweet. It’s almost like candy. :slight_smile:

We have gotten that we don’t really grow a lot of them to preserve but rather keep planting small plantings of them to eat from. Still trying to get the timing of it down for a more consistent harvest knowing that if I want carrots in the spring, it’ll be because I started them in the late fall or early winter here, in the (unheated) greenhouse. I still have yet to have anyone explain to me how I could theoretically produce 100 pounds of carrots each and every month of the year if I wanted to do that, and haven’t assembled the data to know quite how to do that, either. But hey, if I knew everything already, it would probably be boring. :wink: LOL!!

Good luck!

1 Like

Sort of like potatoes.
Mine went through the winter and even some of them died from early frost. But they are back growing prolifically. I will be harvesting past the " normal " time. But nature is taking over.

1 Like

Ok. I am going to run the risk of sounding like a dork. But here it goes.
I have a condition I call. " prunophobia". Yeah. I get scared to prune things in my garden.
I have learned with my indeterminate tomatoes that I can prune a bunch of the lower branches and it keeps growing back. Big. I had tomato plants exploding so much last year and it produced so much that I had more tomatoes than I knew what to do with.
Now. This time it’s zucchini. Leaves as big as large dinner plates. Plants are almost 5 feet tall.
Tons of little zucchini started but they haven’t matured.
I started cutting off leaves that looked wilty or brown or tangled with other leaves.
Cut some off the bottom of the plants to try to give more air circulation and divert energy to producing fruit.
I worked through half of my patch and was going to wait a couple of days to see what happens.
So it doesn’t look very pretty but I guess maybe I am looking for some confirmation or encouragement that I am doing the right thing.
I have read and watched gardening channels that talk about not yielding to the temptation to keep all the pretty green because it is taking up plants energy to make fruit.
And…as a side note this is the first year I have had success with summer squash. Never had plants this big and green.
So…ya think the fruit will mature with a bunch of those leaves cut away?

2 Likes

Well I don’t have a garden. I am on the 19th floor in a little bachelor suite and even if I did have a garden I don’t know a vegetable plant from a weed.
But I wanted to participate in this thread so I am going to tell you what I planted.
I planted my feet on higher ground.


5 Likes

LOVE IT!! :smiley:

I’m getting better at it but I have a long way to go. LOL!!

I would think so.

To be honest, I’ve typically not had a lot of time to work with squash plants because of the squash bugs moving in and killing them all. This is the first year I’m trying them in a high tunnel setting so I’m thinking along the lines of actually tying them up. They do make a sort of “vine” and I’ve heard that you can make them grow up, not just sprawl. Also, with the plant up off the ground, maybe the squash bugs won’t have as much of a place to hide. We’ll see. So pruning will be a good thing, I think.

I’ve heard different people say that on plants like a tomato or a few others, the plant doesn’t need the leaves on the stem below the fruit. I don’t know if that’s applicable to squash as well or not. I’d probably err on the side of leaving them on the plant more so than cutting them off… yeah, “prunophobia”. LOL!! :slight_smile:

2 Likes

I follow a guy in South Texas who’s channel is "Black Gumbo ". He did a couple of videos on pruning tomatoes and said that the indeterminate ones can be pruned at the bottom and will continue to grow taller until the first freeze.
Determinant are the bushy ones that grow to a certain height, produce fruit then die.
So far my tomatoes are growing faster and faster after I prune.
As far as zucchini, I watched a few videos of people saying that cutting off the leaves near the ground allows for air circulation and helps prevent powdery mildew and assists pollinators to get to the flowers in the morning hours when the blossoms open up.
Also, I have yellow straight neck growing in the front yard planter. I checked it in the morning: beautiful little adolescent plant. No fruit yet.
Checked it at suppertime and all the middle stems were eaten away! Looked like rabbit or something. No evidence of bugs or aphids or anything. So …( enter violin) i was sad. Thought it was lost. 2 days later the growth exploded and there’s squash forming.
Perhaps this is what the zucchini needs to mature. A good clean out of leaves and stems without blossoms or fruit.

2 Likes

@BrianT
Take a look at this video. It’s about 10 minutes but says the same thing i saw in the other videos I watched. He gave a bit more information by saying 30-40% of leaves can be pruned.
Believe it or not when I cut some big leaves from the bottom I discovered at least 5 zucchini growing at the base of the plant that I didn’t even see!

2 Likes

I like the MI Gardener videos. :slight_smile: Have learned a bunch from them. :slight_smile:

2 Likes

That’s ok, Dallas T! Did you know that lots of things we think are weeds are really God gifts in disguise! Sheep sorrel, for example, grows wild where I live. It’s delicious! My grandson says it’s his favorite “salad” and dandelions! And Queen Anne’s lace, and lambs quarters and wood betony and plantain and mint and . . . Cat tails and milkweed and . . . Soooo many!!! :joy:

1 Like

Very interesting but I don’t know a single thing you mentioned except the dandelions. Hee Hee.
If I am ever stuck in a forest and starving. I will try a little of something and see how I do. If I am not dead by the next morning I may try eating more of it. Hee Hee.
I am laughing now, as I probably wouldn’t even make it through one night in the forest. I’d die of fright that some animal would eat me or the bugs would sting me to death. Starving would be the least of my problems. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

4 Likes

Glad I was able to make you laugh out loud! That’s one of YOUR special gifts to all of us here! :joy:

2 Likes

Awe thank you. That is so nice. Thank you for the laugh.

3 Likes

I worked on my cucumber plants. Hope I didn’t kill them. I watched several videos and different people have different ideas.
I remember I had cantaloupe last summer that took off and when I pruned them they died :cry:.
Hope I left enough leaves. I tried to pluck off the icky ones on the ground and leaves that looked a bit broken. Guess I will find out in a few days, eh?
Cukes are something else I haven’t had success with before. At least they are growing lush. Now the lesson is…the pruning process.

2 Likes